Become Nothing and He’ll Turn You Into Everything

Become Nothing and He’ll Turn You Into Everything

There are only three religious buildings in Fes and Meknes which can legitimately be visited by non-Muslims.  These are the Al-Attarine and the Bounania in Fes,  and the Bounania in Meknes.  All three buildings are Madrasa,  or religious educational buildings,  and were built in the 14th century.  The Bounania in Fes has a double role as a functioning mosque,  and a part of the complex is off-limits to non-Muslims.

Rather than providing a monologue about each building and its history,  which can easily be found online,  I have provided a selection of random quotes covering a wide range of perspectives relating to Islam to accompany the images.  Some are more controversial than others and most apply to Islam generally rather than specifically Morocco..

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A Tale of Harira in Meknes

A Tale of Harira in Meknes

Link to a full Gallery of images here.

The low concrete dwelling was as white as the line of old tombs to its right, sepulchres built into the tall medina wall which formed one boundary of the old cemetery. A young boy emerged from the dwelling and approached me, his  body appearing to lope rather than walk,  his eyes cast mostly downwards.  Another child emerged from the white dwelling and made her way towards us.  In contrast she walked straight up to me, looked me in the eye, and in a moment of young feminine purpose extended her arm palm open, smiled disarmingly and asked me without any shame whatsoever for ‘l’argent’.

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Of Marabouts, Jinns and Foqahas

Of Marabouts, Jinns and Foqahas

Late on my final afternoon in Meknes in early June 2019 I decided to investigate an interesting religious building I had seen whilst travelling to the holy pilgrimage town of Moulay Idriss Zerhoun by bus several days earlier. This building was situated next to a cemetery on the main ring road which surrounds Meknes close to Bab Berdaine.

I walked under Bab Berdaine and out of the Medina.  From the ring road the view was uninterrupted across countryside as far as the range of hills in the distance where, on the invisible side and out of sight, Moulay Idriss’ mausoleum nestled within a valley.  The landscape was burnished by the early June sun.  Beside me, as I walked, cars,  motor cycles and buses slowly filed by,  their noise destroying an otherwise peaceful afternoon.

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Medinas  and Colour in Morocco

Medinas and Colour in Morocco

Many cities of any size in Morocco have a Medina ‘quarter’; these are distinct city sections which are often the oldest part of the city, walled, with maze like streets and relatively car free. Many cultural, historical and architecturally interesting features can be found in medinas.

A stimulating and visually interesting aspect of walking Moroccan medinas is viewing the colours and street art used to decorate the many alleys and lanes. More than just brightening up inner city thoroughfares it has been suggested that colours are used intentionally as tourist and cultural branding exercises, and that cities are recognised often internationally due to their colours. Examples of this are Chefchaouen, world famous for its blue walls, and Marrakesh, well known for its red colour. Other reasons and explanations for the adoption of colour schemes include reflecting local natural colours, influences from local or national religious associations, regional cultural influences and influence of colour from sub-saharan African contexts.

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