Akermoud : The Beginning of the Daour

Akermoud : The Beginning of the Daour

The first and starting zaouia of the annual Regraga pilgrimage ( Daour ) is found at Akermoud,  a small town to the north of Essaouira.  The zaouia contains the catafalque of Sidi Abdellah ou Hmad,  a Marabout saint.

The Regrega tribe leaders are the descendants of the saint apostles of Islam who, legend suggest, learnt the new religion of Islam on a visit to Mecca. Here they were told by the Prophet to spread Islam to the Maghreb. Every spring (March-April) the descendants carry out a pilgrimage which lasts 39 days and visits 44 sacred places in the region. Pilgrims visit a series of local shrines, from the mouth of the Tensift river south of Safi to the northern outskirts of the High Atlas, including the city of Essaouira .

It traditionally begins from the zaouia at Akermoud.

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Of Love Between Saints and a Jinniyya

Of Love Between Saints and a Jinniyya

You know that you have arrived at the correct destination when the hotel proprietor seriously enquires whether you would like to sacrifice a sheep the following day in  the grotto of Lalla Aisha.  I had arrived at possibly the  strangest place yet on my travels through Morocco.

The small town of Beni Rashid on the Zerhoun mountain is better known as Sidi Ali,  named after the 17th century sufi saint Sidi Ali ben Hamdush.  His tomb lies in his zaouia in a small gulley at the edge of the town looking out over the fertile valley where Meknes can be seen in the distance.   Of more significant interest is that Sidi Ali is bound by legend to another sufi saint,  Sidi Ahmad Dghoughi,  his disciple and servant,  who is buried in the nearby village of Beni Ouarad,  and that they are both bound by legend to a hostile but beautiful female spirit ( jinniya ) called Aisha Qandisha.

It is a love triangle with a difference;  the legend describes how Sidi Ali’s baraka was transferred to Sidi Ahmed upon his death, how the Hamadsha brotherhood obtained its traditional ‘hal’,  that is ecstatic dance,  how music and its healing role of people came into being,  how the Hamadsha acquired its self-harming behaviours once in trance,   and finally how the she-devil Aisha Qandisha became an integrated and indivisible part of the Hamadsha Sufi traditions.

The legend also describes the genesis of the cultural-medico concept of Ethno-Psychiatry where ecstatic dance and spirit expulsion,  sometimes facilitated  by animal sacrifice,  has traditionally been first choice for treating a range of illnesses in Morocco.

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Sufi Brotherhoods and Trance Ceremonies in the Maghreb

Sufi Brotherhoods and Trance Ceremonies in the Maghreb

 

Article taken from here 

Entering the Sufi Spiritual World of North Africa
Sufi Brotherhoods and Trance Ceremonies in the Maghreb

 

Zawiya in Souk Ahras in East Algeria

This zawiya is in Souk Ahras in East of Algeria, sometimes
people call the zawiya a marabout – they really mean the
saint. It happens that meals are offered to the poor
every Friday of the week, here we see in the middle of
the picture people sitting and eating bread, on the left
of the picture a man is standing, he is the caretaker.

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Sidi Ouasmine  :  The Sultan of Regraga

Sidi Ouasmine : The Sultan of Regraga

The annual pilgrimage around the locality of Essaouira every spring is called ‘ Regraga’,  a name which also describes the group of Chorfa ( a darija word denoting noble religious leaders descending from the Prophet Mohamed otherwise known as Sharif )  who make the pilgrimage annually.

The Regragas originate from Chiadma,  a region located on the Atlantic coast between Safi and Essaouira in the south of Morocco.  They are the descendants of the saint apostles of Islam who,  legend suggest, learnt the new religion of Islam on a visit to Mecca.  Here they were told by the Prophet to spread Islam to the Maghreb.  Every spring (March-April) the descendants carry out a pilgrimage which lasts 39 days and visits 44 sacred places in the region. Pilgrims visit a series of local shrines, from the mouth of the Tensift river south of Safi to the northern outskirts of the High Atlas, including the city of Essaouira .

The Pilgrimage contains two groups;  one group stops at every shrine on the way where they build a holy tent of palm fibres which is then dyed with henna.  The other group arrives in procession with a moqadem (religious leader) riding a white horse.

The Daour  (tour) of Regraga starts in the zaouia of Sidi Abdellah ou Hmad in Akermoud and concludes in Sidi Messaoud Boutritiche  in the town of Had Dra .

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