Love is Always in the Mood of Believing in Miracles

Love is Always in the Mood of Believing in Miracles

“It is strange how few people make more than a casual cult of enjoying Nature. And yet the earth is actually and literally the mother of us all. One needs no strange spiritual faith to worship the earth.”

John Cowper Powys,   A Glastonbury Romance,  published 1933

It is perhaps a truism that disparate faiths sit uneasily together in West Penwith, Cornwall.  Evidence of its strong Christian tradition, both Celtic and later,  can be seen everywhere in its wild landscapes and its settlements.  The latter contains its Methodist heritage, reflecting the impassioned ministry of John and Charles Wesley who undertook journeys of 7 days duration from London to Cornwall on horseback to preach both in natural ampitheatres and selected chapels.

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Sancreed

Sancreed

“Sancreed is a land of stone circles and cave-dwellings, crosses and cromlechs, barrows and menhirs, Holy wells and ancient oratories. In no other part of the country are there so many relics of what is popularly called the prehistoric age. Myth and romance, legend and folklore gather about its grey stones. Where so much is hidden in the mists of antiquity, recourse must, on occasion, be had to conjecture in piecing together the story of the past.” (Anon)

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Grenfell

Grenfell

The recent conflagration at Grenfell Tower in London seems destined to be one of those defining moments which socially and unconsciously resonate for generations.  At its most simple ( if it can be described as such ) it is an indescribable tragedy where upwards of 80 people lost their lives.  At its most complex,  it can be seen as a metaphor for the ongoing battleground between political, social and economic groups at different ends of a spectrum,  and for the reductionist set of values current political classes have displayed towards the most poor and disadvantaged within our society.  That this battleground exists within one of the most affluent areas of the UK creates further almost unbearable tensions.

Although essentially a humanitarian tragedy,  there is little chance it will be seen in any terms other than political.  Clashes between council and housing organisations portraying extreme conservative ideology and a population group frustrated by continuing austerity and cutting safety corners predate this tragedy.  Literally inflamed by resident’s concerns regarding safety being ignored for years by the same organisations, those angers and conflicts are currently visible during meetings between elected local government officials and representatives of the local tenants;  early post-tragedy attempts to hold meetings behing closed doors suggested continuing extreme differences of opinion.

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Seven Saints of St Pauls

Seven Saints of St Pauls

In 1948 the Empire Windrush docked in Kingston, Jamaica, to pick up Carribean servicemen who were on leave. The recently introduced British Nationality Act 1948 gave British citizenship to all people living in Commonwealth countries, and full rights of entry and settlement in Britain.

An advertisement was placed in a Jamaican newspaper offering cheap transport on the ship for anybody who wanted to come and work in the UK and many former servicemen took this opportunity to return to Britain with the hopes of rejoining the RAF: others decided to make the journey just to see what England was like. The resulting group of 492 immigrants famously began a wave of migration from the Caribbean to the UK, and as a result the name Windrush has come to be used as shorthand for that migration, and by extension for the beginning of modern British multicultural society. (more…)

Midsummer’s Eve Bonfire Chapel Carn Brea

Midsummer’s Eve Bonfire Chapel Carn Brea

Midsummer, also known as St John’s Day, is recognised on June 24th by the Christian Church June as the feast day of the early Christian martyr St John the Baptist, and the observance of St John’s Day begins the evening before, known as St John’s Eve.

Traditional Midsummer bonfires are still lit on some high hills in Cornwall.  This tradition was revived by the Old Cornwall Society in the early 20th century.

The ancient festival was first described by Dr William Borlase in 1754 in his book Antiquities of Cornwall.

“In Cornwall, the festival Fires, called Bonfires, are kindled on the Eve of St. John the Baptist and St. Peter’s Day; and Midsummer is thence, in the Cornish tongue, called ‘Goluan,’ which signifies both light and rejoicing. At these Fires the Cornish attend with lighted torches, tarr’d and pitch’d at the end, and make their perambulations round their Fires, and go from village to village carrying their torches before them; and this is certainly the remains of the Druid superstition, for ‘faces praeferre,’ to carry lighted torches, was reckoned a kind of Gentilism, and as such particularly prohibited by the Gallick Councils: they were in the eye of the law ‘accensores facularum,’ and thought to sacrifice to the devil, and to deserve capital punishment.” (more…)