Visiting derelict military camps is always interesting.  Not only are the structures interesting in themselves ( though often in a rudimentary way ),  the effect of ageing and intrusion confers an altogether new interpretation.

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These ruins of a military camp are located near Facinas,  Cadiz,  on a road leading into the great Alcornocales ( cork oak ) forests in Andalucia,  southern Spain.  I do not know the camp’s age nor its function within the Civil War or post war period,  though its style and age suggests it was active within the conflict.

The combination of graffiti representing intrusion following its closure and the natural weathering of ruins exposed to the elements were interesting,  suggesting the entanglement of generations and the passing of years.

The photographs were taken several years ago.