Sidi Ishaq and Meditations on Baraka

Sidi Ishaq and Meditations on Baraka

The zaouia/koubba of Sidi Ishaq is located beautifully on the Atlantic coast.  It is a short caleche ride along sandy tracks from the small town of Sidi Ishaq some 3 miles inland.  The caleche park is situated in the centre of the town just off the R301 which dramatically follows the coast as far north as Safi.

 

The final stage of the journey,  when the koubba can first be seen against the surf and the track drops down to the small sandy delta of the dried up river,  is spectacular.

 

I can find no information about Sidi Ishaq,  other than the shrine is a part of the Regraga annual pilgrimage throughout the Chiadme region.

 

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Tamesloht : a Town of Camels,  Sacrifice and Marriage

Tamesloht : a Town of Camels, Sacrifice and Marriage

A gaggle of older men in djellabas were sitting outside of the main entrance into the zaouia of Moulay Abdel Hussein, the grandfather of Moulay Brahim who’s tomb and  zaouia resides a little further south in the foothills of the Atlas mountains.  Both grandfather and grandson and their zaouias, play significant roles in a ritual which forms part of the living history of the Sidna Bilal Gnaoua brotherhood;  a history which is primarily contained in the very music and rituals it performs.

The legend and associated moussem ( festival ) is documented in a former blog post here . (more…)

Sidi Bou Ali,   Lalla Taouirt,   Sidi Hamou Ben Hmida

Sidi Bou Ali, Lalla Taouirt, Sidi Hamou Ben Hmida

Rather than portraying each zaouia as a separate blog entry I have decided to present them in groups.  Here are  zaouias I have visited over the last week or so.  They are located in the vicinity of Akermoud and Telmest,  almost the furthest that the bus travels north of Morocco.  I am quite restricted by the bus times and must take the lighting conditions as I find them.

These are traditionally near the beginning of the Regraga pilgrimage;  Sidi Bou Ali is the second zaouia to be visited in the Daour.

 

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Akermoud : The Beginning of the Daour

Akermoud : The Beginning of the Daour

The first and starting zaouia of the annual Regraga pilgrimage ( Daour ) is found at Akermoud,  a small town to the north of Essaouira.  The zaouia contains the catafalque of Sidi Abdellah ou Hmad,  a Marabout saint.

The Regrega tribe leaders are the descendants of the saint apostles of Islam who, legend suggest, learnt the new religion of Islam on a visit to Mecca. Here they were told by the Prophet to spread Islam to the Maghreb. Every spring (March-April) the descendants carry out a pilgrimage which lasts 39 days and visits 44 sacred places in the region. Pilgrims visit a series of local shrines, from the mouth of the Tensift river south of Safi to the northern outskirts of the High Atlas, including the city of Essaouira .

It traditionally begins from the zaouia at Akermoud.

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Of Love Between Saints and a Jinniyya

Of Love Between Saints and a Jinniyya

You know that you have arrived at the correct destination when the hotel proprietor seriously enquires whether you would like to sacrifice a sheep the following day in  the grotto of Lalla Aisha.  I had arrived at possibly the  strangest place yet on my travels through Morocco.

The small town of Beni Rashid on the Zerhoun mountain is better known as Sidi Ali,  named after the 17th century sufi saint Sidi Ali ben Hamdush.  His tomb lies in his zaouia in a small gulley at the edge of the town looking out over the fertile valley where Meknes can be seen in the distance.   Of more significant interest is that Sidi Ali is bound by legend to another sufi saint,  Sidi Ahmad Dghoughi,  his disciple and servant,  who is buried in the nearby village of Beni Ouarad,  and that they are both bound by legend to a hostile but beautiful female spirit ( jinniya ) called Aisha Qandisha.

It is a love triangle with a difference;  the legend describes how Sidi Ali’s baraka was transferred to Sidi Ahmed upon his death, how the Hamadsha brotherhood obtained its traditional ‘hal’,  that is ecstatic dance,  how music and its healing role of people came into being,  how the Hamadsha acquired its self-harming behaviours once in trance,   and finally how the she-devil Aisha Qandisha became an integrated and indivisible part of the Hamadsha Sufi traditions.

The legend also describes the genesis of the cultural-medico concept of Ethno-Psychiatry where ecstatic dance and spirit expulsion,  sometimes facilitated  by animal sacrifice,  has traditionally been first choice for treating a range of illnesses in Morocco.

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