Sufi Brotherhoods and Trance Ceremonies in the Maghreb

Sufi Brotherhoods and Trance Ceremonies in the Maghreb

 

Article taken from here 

Entering the Sufi Spiritual World of North Africa
Sufi Brotherhoods and Trance Ceremonies in the Maghreb

 

Zawiya in Souk Ahras in East Algeria

This zawiya is in Souk Ahras in East of Algeria, sometimes
people call the zawiya a marabout – they really mean the
saint. It happens that meals are offered to the poor
every Friday of the week, here we see in the middle of
the picture people sitting and eating bread, on the left
of the picture a man is standing, he is the caretaker.

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Sidi Ouasmine  :  The Sultan of Regraga

Sidi Ouasmine : The Sultan of Regraga

The annual pilgrimage around the locality of Essaouira every spring is called ‘ Regraga’,  a name which also describes the group of Chorfa ( a darija word denoting noble religious leaders descending from the Prophet Mohamed otherwise known as Sharif )  who make the pilgrimage annually.

The Regragas originate from Chiadma,  a region located on the Atlantic coast between Safi and Essaouira in the south of Morocco.  They are the descendants of the saint apostles of Islam who,  legend suggest, learnt the new religion of Islam on a visit to Mecca.  Here they were told by the Prophet to spread Islam to the Maghreb.  Every spring (March-April) the descendants carry out a pilgrimage which lasts 39 days and visits 44 sacred places in the region. Pilgrims visit a series of local shrines, from the mouth of the Tensift river south of Safi to the northern outskirts of the High Atlas, including the city of Essaouira .

The Pilgrimage contains two groups;  one group stops at every shrine on the way where they build a holy tent of palm fibres which is then dyed with henna.  The other group arrives in procession with a moqadem (religious leader) riding a white horse.

The Daour  (tour) of Regraga starts in the zaouia of Sidi Abdellah ou Hmad in Akermoud and concludes in Sidi Messaoud Boutritiche  in the town of Had Dra .

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I Am He Who I Love

I Am He Who I Love

I Am He Whom I Love

 I am He whom I love, and He whom I love is I:
 We are two spirits dwelling in one body.
 If thou seest me,  thou seest Him,
 And if thou seest Him, thou seest us both.
 
Hussein Ibn Mansur Al Hallaj

On the bus recently from Casablanca I was fortunate to sit next to a teacher of English from Safi,  a Portuguese coastal city in between Casablanca and Essaouira.  Of the diverse topics we discussed,  perhaps the most interesting was the subject of the current dichotomy in Moroccan society regarding the relevance of traditional superstitious beliefs in comparison with the irresistible march of science and rationality.

Chama was definitely of the belief that the old traditions have had their day,  and that Morocco must continue its progress towards modernity.  I think she considered my interest in Jinn possession and the Sufi co-fraternities  ( Gnaoua,  Hamadcha and Aissouia )  practicing different forms of healing in sacred religious/magical ways with incredulity.

Morocco was for the modern,  with a linear curve heading directly towards an erudite, cosmopolitan and definitely 21st century society.  The traditions were for yesterday.

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Moulay Bouzerktoun

Moulay Bouzerktoun

Some 20 kilometres north of Essaouira is the small village of Moulay Bouzerktoun,  named after the Marabout of the same name.  His mausoleum/zaouia is part of a mosque complex founded on the top of a cliff looking over the Atlantic ocean.

Little seems to be known about his life.  His tomb is included in the annual Regraga,  a month long pilgrimage around the Sufi tombs of the local tribes.

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